Core Work for Dance Technique Using Tahitian Drills

Tahitian Dance is Fun, Addictive, and Compelling

‘Ia ora na! Let’s talk about the stomach and how to utilize them better for all types of physical movements.

Strong stomach muscles are good for you. Why do we want a better core? Added benefits of stronger stomach muscles include a higher sense of confidence, better health, and gaining more energy. If you want to improve your overall fitness, start at the center. Literally, the center is the core, the stomach.

When you gain more strength and control over your abdomen, you feel leaner which might improve your looks. More importantly, when it comes to feeling confident, you stand up straighter because your stomach is supporting your back. Another positive benefit includes higher energy for completing day-to-day tasks. Like many self-improvement tactics, the key to feeling good starts from the inside.

Improving stomach muscles are also important for your overall health. It aids the digestive system, supports the back, and helps speed up the metabolism. If traditional sit-ups aren’t for you – whether they are a chore or just boring, try dance classes. I’m implementing a new focus on dance exercises specific for the arts such as Tahitian and also, all of my physical activities. By incorporating mindful stomach work, I’ve discovered a fluidity and power in my movements that I had previously not tapped into.

Apply the fundamentals learned to many other dance disciplines. There are many core exercise drills for conditioning and technique stemming from the art of Tahitian Dance or Ori. I love Tahitian Ori because I have always encompassed a passion for dance, movement, culture, and the specific rhythmic drum beats of the South Pacific.

There are specific dance steps engaging many parts of the stomach that when used for conditioning helps create bigger movements with control and discipline. I learned a lot of this while working with Tahitian master instructors. But you can use these ideas for many other dance styles and frankly any type of training or coaching you are interested in. Transfer these concepts to your favorite passion. I also hope introducing these exercises will give you more appreciation for the Tahitian arts and culture.

TAHITIAN CORE WORK FOR DANCE TECH

Tahitian Core Work for Dance Technique will improve your core stability in all of your dance style techniques. Whether you are a Belly Dance, a Samba dancer, Ballet dancer, or any type of artistic or non-artistic athlete, these drills will help you engage, activate, and prompt your stomach muscles along the abdomen and increase flexibility in the hips. I have found these core exercises stemming from Tahitian dance incredibly valuable for my improvement in movements for all of the dances I practice. I want to share these insights and help you improve and draw focus to how to properly utilize our most important muscles from our core. Our core is the essential part of the body where we draw strength and keeps us healthy. The first half of class includes amazing technique exercises, drills, and conditioning work. We will then practice dance hip and stomach work from other dance styles from Belly Dance, Hula, and Samba while utilizing the framework from our drills.

Register here for this online livestream class today. This is a one-day class, October 6, 2021, for 60-minutes starting at 4:30 PM EST. If you are unavailable, you can still register and view the class at your convenience.

You do not need to download any additional link or software. At the time of class, simply click the link provided to you and join the class.

I can’t wait to share these exercises and help you with your bodywork. See you soon!

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